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Air Gun Home Forum Index » Clubs/Events/Regional/Political Airgun Issues » FAC Requirements and Information
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FAC Requirements and Information 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2007 11:38 pm Reply with quote
StevieLaner7777
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Here is some useful info regarding current Fire Arm Certificate (FAC) Licensing and legislation:


All firearms in the United Kingdom must be licensed on either a firearm certificate (FAC) or a shotgun certificate.

Shotguns are defined in UK law as smoothbore firearms with barrels not shorter than 24" and a bore not larger than 2" in diameter, no revolving cylinder, and either no magazine, or a non-detachable magazine that is not capable of holding more than two cartridges. This effectively gives a maximum three round overall capacity. Shotguns thus defined are subject to a slightly less rigorous certification process.

A firearm certificate differs from a shotgun certificate in that justification must be provided to the police for each firearm; these firearms are individually listed on the certificate by type, calibre, and serial number. A shotgun certificate similarly lists type, calibre and serial number, but permits ownership of as many shotguns as can be safely accommodated. To gain permission for a new firearm, a "variation" must be sought, for which a fee is payable, unless the variation is made at the time of renewal, or unless it constitutes a one-for-one replacement of an existing firearm which is to be disposed of. The certificate also sets out, by calibre, the maximum quantities of ammunition which may be bought/possessed at any one time, and is used to record the purchasing of ammunition (except, optionally, where ammunition is both bought, and used immediately, on a range).

To obtain a firearm certificate, the police must be convinced that a person has "good reason" to own each gun, and that they can be trusted with it "without danger to the public safety or to the peace". Under Home Office guidelines, gun licences are only issued if a person has legitimate sporting or work-related reasons for owning a gun. Since 1946, self-defence has not been considered a valid reason to own a gun. The current licensing procedure involves: positive verification of identity, two referees of verifiably good character who have known the applicant for at least two years (and who may themselves be interviewed and/or investigated as part of the certification), approval of the application by the applicant's own family doctor, an inspection of the premises and cabinet where guns will be kept and a face-to-face interview by a Firearms Enquiry Officer (FEO) also known as a Firearms Liaison Officer (FLO). A thorough background check of the applicant is then made by Special Branch on behalf of the firearms licensing department. Only when all these stages have been satisfactorily completed, will a licence be issued.

Any person who has spent more than three years in prison is automatically banned for life from obtaining a gun licence.

Any person holding a gun licence must comply with strict conditions regarding such things as safe storage. These storage arrangements are checked by the police before a licence is first granted, and on every renewal of the licence. A local police force may impose additional conditions on ownership, over and above those set out by law. Failure to comply with any of these conditions can mean forfeiture of the gun licence and surrender of any firearms to the police.

The penalty for possession of a prohibited firearm without a certificate is currently a mandatory minimum five year prison sentence and an uncapped fine.

In addition, the proposed Violent Crime Reduction Bill, if passed, would increase restrictions on the use, ownership, sale and manufacture of both airguns and imitation firearms.



Stevie Thumb Up!

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But what about airguns? 
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 8:50 pm Reply with quote
Jim McArthur
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But, how do these UK laws apply as against air guns?

Jim

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 11:29 pm Reply with quote
AirGunEric
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Any air-powered gun that goes over the defined maximum muzzle energy output becomes a "firearm" under the law and requires a license to purchase and/or own.

For air pistols- 6fpe
For air rifles- 12fpe
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2007 3:40 am Reply with quote
Alstone
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I would add to that reguarding pistols, no one apart from goverment agency's can own a pistol and get a Fire Arm Certificate, so a 6 fpe pistol is the best you can do in the UK, if it does go over 6 fpe it would be classed as a firearm which is illegal and is a criminal offence and you go to prision for 5 years!

I hope that helps

Al
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How powerful? 
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2007 6:49 am Reply with quote
Jim McArthur
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I get it...so, a powerful-enough air pistol becomes a "firearm pistol" and like any firearm pistol is banned to private citizens.

Is there a way this "fpe" can be expressed in terms of muzzle velocity?

I understand that there is a pistol ban in the UK. Crying or Very sad Are there ANY exceptions for collectors?

Also: how is it that some shooters are permitted to own and compete with "long-barrelled revolvers"? Huh?

Jim

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2007 10:00 am Reply with quote
AirGunEric
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Muzzle energy would dictate what muzzle velocity a specific pellet of a specific weight has exiting the gun. For example a 7.9gr pellet traveling 850fps would mean there is 12.7fpe- thus illegal in the UK without a Firearms certificate- the same gun, if it could only achieve 800fps with the 7.9gr pellet would be under 12fpe in muzzle energy and legal without any sort of license.

As for a 'long barreled revolver' perhaps its long barrel makes it more a "rifle" than a "pistol"?
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2007 10:27 am Reply with quote
Alstone
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It's a matter of mix and match over here choose any pellet weight you like, and match it with a fps that dosen't go over 6 or 12 fpe depending which ever you are using, pistol or rifle.
The problem is if you are out shooting a .22 with a 14g pellet and under 12 fpe, the police can test your rifle with an 8g pellet which would take it over the 12fpe, "Your Nicked", so people tend to make sure that there airgun cannot go over the limit by limiting the output with the lightest pellet equalling less than the legal limit. As you can appreciate this is difficult on a hot day with Co2.

As for long barreled pistols the barrel must be at least 16" long, and there must be a sholder stock permanently attatched, and as far as I know you can shoot pistols if they were made before 1911, but I will have to check what the restrictions are on this one.

Hope you can make sense of this because the British Goverment can't,
and there's a load more comming out in October.

Al
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new laws October 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2008 3:34 pm Reply with quote
H
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What is coming new law in October?
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 09, 2008 9:16 am Reply with quote
Jim McArthur
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Alstone wrote:


As for long barreled pistols the barrel must be at least 16" long, and there must be a sholder stock permanently attatched, and as far as I know you can shoot pistols if they were made before 1911, but I will have to check what the restrictions are on this one.

Hope you can make sense of this because the British Goverment can't,
and there's a load more comming out in October.

Al


I thought the LBR minimum barrel length was 12 inches, but could well be wrong.

Jim

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FAC Requirements and Information 
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